LaCrosse Encephalitis

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La Crosse Encephalitis Virus (LACV) is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. Most cases of LACV disease occur in the upper Midwestern and mid-Atlantic and southeastern states. Many people infected with LACV will show no apparent symptoms. However, among the people who do become ill, initial symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and tiredness.

Some of those who become ill develop severe neuroinvasive disease (disease that affects the nervous system). Severe LACV disease often involves encephalitis (an inflammation of the brain) and can include seizures, coma, and paralysis. The severe disease occurs most often in children under the age of 16 and in rare cases, long-term disability or death can result from La Crosse Encephalitis.

There is no specific treatment for LACV infection– care is based on symptoms. If you or a family member have symptoms of severe LACV disease or any symptoms causing you concern, consult a healthcare provider for proper diagnosis.

 

Need more information? Follow this link to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

LINK TO CDC